RESEARCH

The SMART Arm enables intensive and repetitive practice of a functional upper limb task during rehabilitation. SMART Arm training in combination with standard therapy, has the potential to improve recovery of upper limb function in those with severe motor disability. The immediate and long-term effects of SMART Arm training on upper limb impairment, activity and participation are currently being explored, in addition to the benefit of training with or without OT-stim to augment movement when compared to usual therapy alone. We will update you on this research as soon as the studies are completed.

separator

SMARTARM PUBLICATIONS

Hayward KS, Neibling BA, Barker RN.
Self-Administered, Home-Based SMART (Sensorimotor Active Rehabilitation Training) Arm Training: A Single-Case Report. Am J Occup Ther. 2015 Jul-Aug;69(4): p1-8.
READ MORE

Hayward KS, Barker RN, Brauer SG, Lloyd D, Horsley SA, Carson RG. SMART Arm with outcome-triggered electrical stimulation: a pilot randomized clinical trial. Topics in stroke rehabilitation, 20, (4), 2013, p289 – 298
READ MORE

Tate EKR, Hayward KS and Barker RN. The SMART Arm can be used by a stroke survivor with severe and multiple impairments: A mixed methods, single case study. In: Special Issue: Smart Strokes 2013 Conference. Risk, Recovery and Reorganisation 9th Australasian Nursing and Allied Health Stroke Conference. Smart Strokes 2013 Conference, Queensland, Australia, (21-21). 22 -23 August 2013.
READ MORE

Brauer SG, Hayward KS, Carson RG, Cresswell AG, Barker RN. The efficacy of SMART Arm training early after stroke for stroke survivors with severe upper limb disability: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial. BMC Neurol. 2013 Jul 2;13:71.
READ MORE

Barker RN, Brauer SG, Carson RG. Training of reaching in stroke survivors with severe and chronic upper limb paresis using a novel nonrobotic device: A randomized clinical trial. 2008, Stroke, 39(6), 1800-1807.
READ MORE

Barker RN, Brauer SG, Barry BK, Gill TJ, Carson RG. Training-induced modifications of corticospinal reactivity in severely affected stroke survivors. Experimental Brain Research, 2012, 221(2), 211-221.
READ MORE

Barker RN, Brauer SG, Carson RG. Training-induced changes in the pattern of triceps to biceps activation during reaching tasks after chronic and severe stroke. Experimental Brain Research, 196(4), 483-496.
READ MORE

separator

STROKE PUBLICATIONS

Hayward KS, Brauer SG. Dose of arm activity training during acute and subacute rehabilitation post stroke: A systematic review of the literature. Clin Rehabil. 2015 Jan 7. [Epub ahead of print]
READ MORE

Finch E, Fleming J, Clark K, Hayward KS. Interdisciplinary rehabilitation outcomes following thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke: a case series. NeuroRehabilitation. 2014; 35(1):9-16.
READ MORE

Eng XW, Brauer SG, Kuys SS, Lord M, Hayward KS. Factors Affecting the Ability of the Stroke Survivor to Drive Their Own Recovery outside of Therapy during Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation. Stroke Res Treat. 2014;2014:626538. Epub 2014 Mar 27.
READ MORE

Hayward KS, Barker RN, Carson RG, Brauer SG. The effect of altering a single component of a rehabilitation programme on the functional recovery of stroke patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis, Clinical rehabilitation, 28, (2), 2014, p107-17
READ MORE

Barker RN, Brauer SG, Barry BK, Gill TJ, Carson RG. Clinically important improvements in motor function are achievable during inpatient rehabilitation by stroke patients with severe motor disability: a prospective observational study. NeuroRehabilitation. 2014;34(4):773-9.
READ MORE

Hayward KS, Kuys SS, Barker RN, Brauer SG. Can stroke survivors with severe upper arm disability achieve a clinically important change in arm function during inpatient rehabilitation? A multicentre, prospective, observational study. NeuroRehabilitation. 2014;35(1):17-23.
READ MORE

Finch E, Hayward KS, Fleming J, Copland DA. Identifying implications of thrombolysis for stroke rehabilitation: knowledge gaps in current research. Disabil Rehabil. 2013 Jun;35(11):924-30. Epub 2012 Oct 15. Review.
READ MORE

INVENTORS

ruth-barker

Ruth Barker is the Clinical Leader at Community Rehab nQ, Northern Australia Primary Health Ltd and adjunct senior lecturer at James Cook University. Ruth’s PhD studies on recovery of the arm after stroke led to the development of the SMART ArmTM. Ruth has continued with research to refine the SMART ArmTM for use in the acute hospital, community and home environment. In addition, Ruth has developed the ‘Drive your own recovery’ program which incorporates SMART Arm training into a comprehensive upper limb training program. Ruth has a strong clinical background in neurological rehabilitation and experience in service delivery across settings in metropolitan, rural and remote locations in Australia.

richard-carson

Richard Carson is Chair in Cognitive Neuroscience of Ageing at Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience. Prof Carson brings international expertise to the SMART ArmTM team in the understanding and measurement of central nervous system plasticity within the context of human movement and mechanisms of neuromuscular coordination. Much of his current clinical and pre-clinical research has a specific emphasis upon the neuro-rehabilitation of stroke survivors. He was a co-investigator on the recent NHMRC clinical trial.

kate-hayward

Kate Hayward has completed her PhD on the rehabilitation potential of stroke survivors with severe upper limb disability, use of the SMART ArmTM being one intervention explored, at the University of Queensland. Kate also completed her honours project on the SMART ArmTM, which led to refinement of the device for use in the hospital environment.

sandy-brauer

Sandy Brauer is a Professor in the Division of Physiotherapy, The University of Queensland, where she leads the Neurology Research Team. She brings expertise to the SMART ArmTM team in the area of clinical trials to test intervention efficacy and has been involved in the development and evaluation of the SMART ArmTM from its inception. Currently she leads several clinical trials, including the current trial on the use of the SMART ArmTM device with acute stroke patients with severe paresis.

david-lloyd

David Lloyd is a Laboratory Manager at Queensland Brain Institute, University of Queensland. He has been involved in research in the areas of UWB Radar, Magnetic Resonance Micro-imaging, Speech Pathology, Sensorimotor Control, and Cognitive Neuroscience. He has been instrumental in the design, development, and programming of the prototype control/feedback software for the SMART ArmTM.